To measure and therefore focus on results to drive your online and social media marketing campaigns is crucial to keep what works and change what doesn’t.

Shares, reach, followers, readers, traffic to your website… Out of all important metrics to watch this year, we’ve selected five, which are easy for small businesses to apply after each campaign.

1. Social Media referrals

What is this?

Visits your website receives coming from social platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Google+, StumbleUpon, Digg, Reditt and so on.

How to measure

Use Google Analytics. On a previous post called “how to measure traffic and sales coming from social media” we detailed how to do it step by step.

Keep an eye on…

Provide value to your contents. There’s no need for me to repeat what you already know: do not try to over-sell via social networks. That does not work. Produce contents that your community will read.

Engage your influencers. It’s probable you find fans or followers with a bigger community than your own. Find them and start a good relationship with them by commenting their blog posts, following their social networks… They’ll soon be thanking you.

Focus on those social networks that actually drive more traffic to your website. After a few measurements, you’ll know what platforms are working best in order to focus your attention on them. Do not try to cover many of them otherwise you’ll end up leaving them all.

2. Comments and questions on social media

What is this?

It’s your followers and fans’ feedback across social media.

How to measure

To me, Hootsuite still is the best tool. You can also use  Twitter analytics for Twitter analysis or Facebook Analytics. Learn how to measure your Facebook campaigns within the free Ebook we released to celebrate SWIt’s first anniversary.

Keep an eye on…

Monitor and reply as much as you can. You’ll find it easier using Hootsuite. Plan a routine to check your social networks for 30 minutes every day and reply all your fans and followers’ comments or questions. That action will generate a much quicker growth of your community and will boost engagement.

Offer your community what it’s looking for. I’m not talking here about vouchers or contests. Try to give them good content they’ll find useful. Check out how to get to know the best content to publish in our previous post written by Pilar Barrio

3. Email subscriptions / Email opened

What is this?

It’s your list of email subscriptions so it’s the number of people opening your newsletters.  Despite all new ways to engage and socialise, email newsletters still drive very good results, studies say. What you should avoid is to spam your customers.

How to measure

So far the best tool seems to be iContact. It allows you to send emails massively as well as manage your email lists.

Keep an eye on…

The subject and head line. Make it clear, easy to understand what you want to communicate and appealing at once. Go straight to the point.

Try different newsletters templates and days to send it over. Then, keep what it works the best. Let me highlight something here: two informative emails per month (two per week at most) would be perfect. Over that you risk they think your emails are spam.

Update your lists and make them grow. If you launch contests on Facebook or other social networks, remember the application you are using probably give you the chance to keep your contestants’ emails (under their consent). This is a sample of how to grow your lists.

Reward those who use to open your emails. The use of iContact will give you the analysis of those who actually open your emails. That way you’ll be able to reward their fidelity with a special mention in a given moment, for example.

4. News, mentions and reviews on blogs

What is this?

Posts and reviews on blogs as well as users mentioning your brand anywhere on the Internet.

How to measure

I’ve always recommended Google Alert or Social Mention to track mentions on social platforms, blogs, chats… They are really useful and easy to use.

Keep an eye on…

Share the latest and hottest news on your field. I use LinkedIn Groups and Google+ communities to spread interesting information I find everyday (about social media marketing that is). That way you’ll be able to give important information to those who need it and they will probably return the favour by following you.

Keep in touch with those bloggers and take part in their blogs and social networks.

5. Website Rank on Search Engines

What is this?

It’s the page and position of your website on search engines such as Google or Bin.

How to measure

The easier tools to get this data are Hubspot Website Grader and DIYSEO.

Keep an eye on…

Your content. Remember to focus on publishing posts of interest to your audience. Watch out your grammar and try to contextualize the matter. Keep your posts over 250 words.

Optimize your site for SEO and add social buttons. Make sure you get the Google Authorship. In order to do this right, you probably should contact your web designer.

Take into account the “content fatigue”. This is a concept I read once in Vocus and I loved it because it’s totally right. If you write about similar subjects once and again, your readers will fed up. So you should diversify. Plan a good content calendar with different themes to write about every month.

Any other metric that comes up to your mind? Share it with us below on comments! You know I love to learn from you all.

In the meantime, follow the latest trends and info about social media via our Twitter or Google+ accounts, find new pictures and infographics on Pinterest or join our interesting conversations with other specialists on our fanpage and our LinkedIn Group. We’ll be waiting for you!

Sources: HubspotVocus